Sever’s Disease: Episode 54

  • In this episode: Sever’s disease – Is your child experiencing heel pain, especially during sport or after.

  • Chip Review: Lorenz – Crunchips Cheese & Onion – Thank you Steve Kovisto (11:05)

  • Trivia question of the week: Can you name the two state capitals, which contain the entire name of the state in their spelling? (09:25)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

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Brief except from the episode:
Sever’s Disease aka calcaneal apophysitis, juvinille heel pain. It is inflammation of the growth plate of the calcaneus (heel bone).
This is most common in kids going through a growth spurt. Age 12 is the most likely age but it can occur before or after. Boys are more likely then girls to present with this pain.
Almost always pain is produced during physical activity and particularly sports. Pain will linger after and can settle down with a few minutes or hours. Pain always returns with participation in sport again.
Running and jumping sports are the most common. However, it can be seen with any sport depending on activity level.
This issue can be present for several weeks or months and will typical resolve on its own once the bones slow down or stop growing. That is why it is so common during a growth spurt.
Essential what happens is that the pull of the Achilles tendon on the immature skeleton causes the bone to deform. You can sometimes see a more prominent heel bone in adults who as children dealt with Sever’s Disease.
Other episodes you might enjoy:

Achilles Tendonitis: Episode 48

Foot & Ankle Health with Dr. Mohammad Rimawi: Episode 40

Plantar Fasciitis: Episode 11

Dry Needling: Episode 51

  • In this episode: Functional Dry Needling (01:30)

  • Chip Review: Calbee – Hot & Spicy Thank you Steve Kovisto (13:21)

  • Trivia question of the week: Which women has appeared in the most FIFA Women’s World Cups?(11:53)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

What is Dry Needling? There are a number of theories. We are going to go in depth on Functional Dry Needling (FDN). With this particular style of needling you are looking to improve movement. By improving movement, pain and discomfort should also reduce.
The other models include the Trigger Point model, Energy Crisis model, Radiculopathic model, and the Motor End-Plate model. I always like to think of FDN in a more simple way.
FDN helps to reset the muscle. So if the muscle is over firing, spasming or chronically tight you can get it to relax by putting a needle in there. If it doing the opposite so not firing you can put the needle in there and get it activate. The analogy I like to use is that of a computer. We’ve all experienced a time when our computer is not working, as we like. So the first thing we do is shut the computer down and turn it back on again. We reset it and that more often then not will get it to start working again.
So with the body if we can get it to start moving better often times we can get the pain to reduce and eventually go away. The important thing to remember is that FDN along is usually not enough to make a lasting change. We always like to follow up all out treatments with a series of therapeutic exercise. These exercises are going to ensure a long lasting change.
Other episodes you might be interested in:

Pain: Episode 29

Ice or Heat?: Episode 23

Radicular Pain: Episode 22

 

Morton’s Neuroma: Episode 49

  • In this episode: Morton’s Neuroma. Pain in the forefoot and between the toes, sometimes numbness and/0r tingling. Usually related to tight footwear. (01:06)

  • Chip Review: Pop Chips Potato – Crazy Hot, Thank you to Skylar and his Mom (12:45)

  • Trivia question of the week: What names were given to the three tunnels in the movie The Great Escape? (11:10)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

Morton’s neuroma symptoms, typically pain in the foot, worse with shoe wear or boot wear or stake wear, any kind of compression of the foot. It is most common in middle age. More common in women, but that could just be footwear related. Most commonly seen a the 3rd digital nerve. However, any of the digital nerves are possible. More or less the middle of the foot.
A neuroma is typically caused by an enlargement of the nerve ending, almost like a benign tumor of the nerve ending. This enlargement then causes compression, which results in pain, numbness, and/or tingling. Historically surgery, minimally invasive, to remove the growth was an early treatment option.
Much more recently physical therapy treatment and other non-surgical options have been found to be as if not more effective. Intrinsic foot strengthening, getting the muscle of the foot stronger as well as doing a shoe assessment and looking at the daily activities that are causing pressure on the forefoot are the places to start working to correct.
Generally speaking unloading the forefoot will help. Djimmer has been using a very simple taping technique where you pinch the bottom of the foot together. This causes the top of the foot to open up and reduce the pressure on the neuroma. 99/100 times this will relieve the neuroma. This is a temporary solution but it allows for patients to be comfortable and then work on strengthening, balance and the other aspects of treatment.
If taping is helpful often times an off the rack orthotic will be appropriate. You don’t always need a $3-400 orthotic custom made for it to be affective. This is something you can cut to length and move from one shoe to the other.
Shoes and getting shoes that fit properly is one of the easiest and quickest ways to help yourself. Reducing pressure on the forefoot is going to be the primary cause of a Morton’s neuroma so reducing that pressure is part of the long term solution.

Other episodes you might find useful:

 

Stress Fractures: Episode 43

Foot & Ankle Health with Dr. Mohammad Rimawi: Episode 40

Plantar Fasciitis: Episode 11

Ankle Sprain_Inversion Type: Episode 3

 

Achilles Tendonitis: Episode 48

  • In this episode: We discuss Achilles Tendonitis

  • Chip Review: Chio – Sweet Chili & Red Pepper (13:40)

  • Trivia question of the week: Which 2 US states boarder 8 other states? (13:17)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

Achilles tendonitis is the topic today. Before we get to far into that here is a brief overview of the Achilles.

 

The Achilles is the largest tendon in the body, it is one of the toughest to tear. We did a whole podcast on Achilles Repair. The Achilles is the attachment for the gastrocnemius, a two joint muscle, and the soleus (one joint muscle). These muscles make up the two layers of the calf. The gastrocnemius is the fast twitch muscle and the soleous is the slow twitch. Both muscles are innervated by the tibial nerve.
The group as a whole is responsible for forced plantar flexion, also known as push-off as well as eccentric dorsi-flexion aka landing. You will see Achilles tendonitis fairly often in a few groups of individuals.
Runners are the most commonly affected group. You also see Achilles tendonitis with impact sports such as basketball, tennis, lacrosse, soccer and volleyball. There is a good deal of research that has found that increased BMI also plays a role.
Some differential diagnosis is often appropriate when given a diagnosis of Achilles tendonitis. With younger ages, people who are going through a growth spurt, you will sometimes see Sever’s Disease diagnosed as Achilles tendonitis. Sever’s is similar to Osgood-Schlatter’s disease at the heel instead of the knee. With an older population you can see calcaneal bursitis and rarely a partial Achilles tear or calf strain.
If left untreated a tendonitis can become a tendonosis. A tendonosis is much harder to treat. This is a chronic condition that is no longer in the inflammatory stage. Our recommendation with tendonitis is to treat it early and not to let it get out of hand. Physical therapy is a great tool in managing and treating Achilles tendonitis.

Check out our other podcast with similar topics:

Foot & Ankle Health with Dr. Mohammad Rimawi: Episode 40

Achilles Repair with Peter Jennings: Episode 38

Plantar Fasciitis: Episode 11

Ankle Sprain_Inversion Type: Episode 3

 

Nutrition for Recovery with Amanda Turner: Episode 44

  • In this episode: We speak with Amanda Turner from Active Fueling on the role nutrition plays with recovery and what we can do to help ourselves out.

  • Chip Review: Private Selection (Kroger) – Sea Salt & Balsamic Vinegar

  • Trivia question of the week: Why are beans the magical fruit that make you toot?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

Timeline

00:00 – Intro
            – Amanda Turner from Activefueling Nutrition
            – Private Selection (Kroger) – Sea Salt & Balsamic Vinegar
00:37 – Probiotics vs Anti-probiotics
01:16 – Amanda Turner Resume
02:20 – 2x Boston Marathon Qualifier
02:50 – Active Fueling
            – Right in the heart of DTC
03:14 – Do we still call it a diet?
04:40 – Let’s start with Dixie State
05:28 – Is there something nutritional that everyone can benefit from during their
recovery?
06:12 – Food you love or hate from recovery?
07:05 – High sugar and high carb, the same thing?
07:29 – General guidelines to reduce the barrier to entry on proper nutrition?
08:16 – Food is not just a fuel source
10:07 – Weight is not a measure of health
11:14 – BMI (body mass index)
12:27 – Which is why I drink Coffee and are Eggs good for you or bad?
13:01 – Choline is great for the brain –
13:26 – Red wine
13:55 – How important is hydration to recovery?
            – 60% of our body weight is water
15:08 – Hydration options outside of H2O
15:42 – How about chocolate milk as a recovery aide?
17:05 – There is an upper limit on calcium
17:37 – Kids do the funniest stuff with their diets
18:46 – Protens, Carbs, Fats and sugars are needed for functions of the body
21:10 – That’s a big red flag
22:29 – Are there better times to eat? Is carb loading a real thing?
24:05 – Timing on eating for sports performance and recovery
25:06 – Consistent timing and context based
25:43 – Recovery is not just 1 meal
26:21 – What foods should people be eating during prolonged activity?
            – Sugar? Whole foods?
27:28 – When I’m hiking I eat Snickers
28:16 – One food everyone should avoid and one food people would eat more of?
30:30 – How about that kale train?
30:50 – I love how Brussels sprouts….
31:16 – I just finished watching Salt Fat Acid Heat
31:47 – Pizza Hut and Kale
32:40 – How much chocolate should I eat?
34:31 – On a side note – Buckler Beer
35:42 – Trivia Time!!
            – Last week: In what sport would you perform the Fosbury flop? High Jump
            – This weeks: Why are beans the magical fruit that make you toot?
37:01 – Chip Time!!
            – Private Selection (Kroger) Sea Salt & Balsamic Vinegar
39:25 – I could use a little more acid – I’d be interested to hear what you learned
40:25 – The first attempt at the Outro
40:32 – How to contact Amanda
            – ActiveFueling.com
            – Phone: 720-598-0018
            – Facebook – Active Fueling Nutrition
            – Twitter – @activefueling
            – Instagram – @activefuelingnurtrition
41:55 – Should we refrigerate chocolate? How about Butter? Eggs?
43:31 – E. coli
43:50 – Outro for real this time
Other Episodes you might be interested in:

Intro to Rebound Therapy and Wellness Clinic: Episode 1

Dr. Mike Pascoe Interview: Episode 12

Scoliosis: Episode 37

  • In this episode: We cover Scoliosis. Which has several varieties affecting people across the lifespan.

  • Chip Review: Albert Heijn Kronkels – Big ups to McKenna Homner for the hand delivery

  • Trivia question of the week: We forgot to ask it but it should have been – What is the highest grossing movie of the 80’s?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

Scoliosis is our topic today and we will be reviewing Albert Heijn Kronkels, compliments of McKenna Homner. Kronkels also known as Vockles. Yes, this is the store brand version. They are a little wider then the Vockle which is a tight spiral. Like a corkscrew. Yes, the Vockle is more like a Fritos Twist.
Scoliosis, there are a couple main types. We won’t be able to fully discuss all the kinds. The big diagnosis value is the Cobb Angle. The Cobb Angle measures the amount of curvature in the spine. Anything-greater than 10degrees is considered officially scoliosis. That could be functional which you could actively correct. Or postural which you could not actively correct.
When with physical therapy we see a secondary diagnosis of scoliosis that is typically a functional instead of structural. Commonly the functional type is 10ish degrees or at least milder.
One of the more commons ones is adolescent idiopathic. This is going to affect a small percentage. Less then 5% of kids going through their teenage years, the growth spurt years. These are individuals without any other cause for the curvature. So idiopathic means; without a cause.
The more significant forms are congenital, which is due typically to a birth defect and neuromuscular which is secondary to another issue; Muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy or some other kind of neurological disorder.
Scoliosis is either a “C” or “S” shape. This is named for the curve the spine assumes. If you look at someone’s back and the spine is not straight like and “I” but curves like a “C”. That would be a “C” scoliosis. If it has a double curve then it would be an “S” scoliosis.

Check out some of these related podcast topics:

 

Core/Abdominal Wall: Episode 35

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction: Episode 27

Low Back Pain: Episode14

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