The Final Episode: 140

  • The final episode of 2 Physical Therapist N’ a Bag of Chips. Double Chip review, trivia and a review of Season 3. As well as a look back at some of the high points of the podcast. After almost 9 years at Rebound, Christiaan has decided to take a job working as a physical therapist with the VA.
  • Chip Review @ (13:50): Kettle – Habanero Lime & Lays – Kettle Cooked – Extra Extreme Cheddar (both compliments of Tony Crea)
  • Trivia question of the week @ (10:28): What country does France share the longest boarder with?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Chip of the Year: Episode 52

Episode 100:

Season 2 Chip of the Year: Episode 104

Osteopenia/Osteoporosis

 

  • Osteopenia is the early stage of osteoporosis. Both are the loss of bone mass and result in a weakening of the bone leading to increased risk of fracture.

  • Chip Review @ (08:24): Kettle Brand – Parmesan Garlic

  • Trivia question of the week @ (06:03): What is Canada’s most populated city?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

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Brief overview of the episode:

            Osteoporosis translates to pores bone. This is a condition that is affecting about 3 million Americans right now. More women than men are affected. Osteopenia is the early stage. Where bone density is beginning to deteriorate but has not yet reached a critical stage.

            The reason these two conditions are a concern is become weak bones have a greater opportunity to fracture. These can occur without trauma when the condition is sever enough. Most people who are affected by osteoporosis will present with back pain, stopped posture and loss of height. All of these symptoms are a result of fracture to the spine.

            The good news is that both osteopenia and osteoporosis can be treated to some extent. Medications, diet changes, and exercises are the prime methods. Physical therapy can help with the exercise portion.

            Bones respond to something called “Wolf’s Law” this law states that bones respond to stresses placed on them. When there is low stress the bone loses density. When there is higher stress the bones gain density. This is why exercises is such a valuable tool when treating osteopenia/osteoporosis.

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Stretching: Episode 25

Dr. Mike Pascoe Interview: Episode 12

Stress Fractures: Episode 43

Patella Fracture: Episode 85

  • In this episode: Patella fractures are thankfully not common. They do however; pose a unique set of challenges when recovering from them.

  • Chip Review @ (13:42): Kettle – New York Cheddar (Thank You Karin)

  • Trivia question of the week @ (12:27): What was stolen in the Shel Silverstein poem “Stop Thief!”?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

Apple Podcasts:

Google Play:

Youtube: 

Stitcher: 

Podbean: 

Spotify:

 

 

Brief overview of the episode:

 

            The Patella, better known as the kneecap can sustain a fractured. This will typical happen as a result of trauma, usually a fall directly onto the knee, or any blunt trauma directly to the front of the knee. In rare instances a large eccentric (lengthening while contracting) load through the quadriceps can also cause a patella fracture.
            Thankfully a patella fracture makes up only 1% of all bone injuries. This occurs at a 2:1 ratio male to female and generally ages 20-50.
            Fractures are labeled either simple or complex. With patella fractures typically a complex fracture is a horizontal break causing disruption of the extensor mechanism, while simple fracture are vertical or partial fractures.
            Knee pain following blunt trauma that results in inability or sharp decline in walking ability, as well as swelling, range of motion loss, weakness and difficulty or inability to straighten knee are all signs of patella fracture. X-ray is the best way to visual the patella and will show any fracture.
            Treatment will be either surgical for complex fractures or at a minimum bracing for simple. The patella will heal in 6-8 weeks to point where increased physical activity can be performed. Depending on the specifics of the fracture physical therapy will usually be initiated following an immobilization period this can be a short as a few days but will be typically be following 6-8 weeks.
            Long-term problems do arise with osteoarthritis. Anytime a surface containing cartilage is damaged there is much higher potential for longer-term arthritic changes. In the short term return to most activities will occur between 3-6 months and return to sport and higher level activities is usually between 6-12 months.

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Ice or Heat?: Episode 23

Shin Splint: Episode 17

ACL Recovery: Episode 13

Patella Femoral Pain Syndrome: Episode 32

 

Colles’ Fracture: Episode 72

  • In this episode: A Colles’ Fracture is a type of wrist fracture and is the most common fracture among young people and the elderly.

  • Chip Review: Kettle Brand – Apple Cider Vinegar (Thank you Karin & Aidan) – (12:41)

  • Trivia question of the week: What animal has cube-shaped poop? – (11:25)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

Apple Podcasts:

Google Play:

Youtube: 

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Podbean: 

Brief overview of the episode:

            The Colles’s fracture is a type of wrist fracture. It of the distal radius, the bone the forearm bone on the thumb side. With this type, the radius is displaced in a posterior (dorsal) direction. The Colles’ fracture is actually the most common fracture among your people and the elderly.

In most cases this injury occurs as a result of a FOOSH. Fall on out stretched hand. Outside of the mechanism of injury (the FOOSH), a visual “dinner fork” deformity is the most common sign. With a dinner fork deformity the transition from forearm > wrist > hand will look more like that of a fork than it’s more common straight line.

Typically a cast for 4-8 weeks or surgery to place a plate and screws is required to heal the fracture. Physical therapy can begin as soon as 1 week, if surgery is done. But usually it is after the cast comes off so closer to 4-8 weeks.

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Imaging: Episode 45

Intro to Rebound Therapy and Wellness Clinic: Episode 1

Fall prevention & Balance: Episode 19

 

 

Patellar Tendonitis: Episode 61

  • In this episode: We discuss patellar tendonitis (inflammatory) and tendonosis (chronic). Signs, symptoms and some treatment options available.

  • Chip Review: Kettle Brand – Wood Smoked Sea Salt (13:52)

  • Trivia question of the week: Why is this sentence special? The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. (12:25)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

Apple Podcasts:

Google Play:

Youtube: 

Stitcher: 

Podbean: 

Brief except from the episode:

Patellar Tendonitis, pain and discomfort directly in the front of your knee. Your patella tendon is the soft portion between your knee cap (patella) and shin (tibial tuberosity).
Generally speaking there is a gradual onset. Hurts a little goes away, hurts again later a little more etc… This is also called “jumpers’ Knee”.
It has been linked to early sport specialization. Younger individuals who perform the same activity the whole year around tend to have a higher incidence of patella tendonitis.
Some differential diagnosis for this can be Osgood-Schlatter disease, which is bone pain on the tibial tuberosity or Sinding larsen johansson syndrome. Which is bone pain of the inferior patella pole (bottom of the knee cap). These both occur in the immature skeleton.
There is good article by Mark F. Reinking called Current Concepts in the Treatment of Patellar Tendinopathy. Which looks at the intrinsic and extrinsic aspect related to patellar tendon issues. (Give it a read if you have the time).
Treatment wise we are always looking to find related issues whether that is weakness, range of motion loss or excess, shoe wear and activity level.
Patellar tendonitis is highlighted by local inflammation. If left untreated it can progress to patellar tendonosis, which is more difficult to recover from. If you think you might have tendonitis come see us or your local physical therapist and have it addressed sooner rather than later.

Other Episodes you might Enjoy

Knee Pain: Episode 2

Patella Femoral Pain Syndrome: Episode 32

Shin Splint: Episode 17

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS): Episode 9

Knee Pain: Episode 2

 

Chip of the Year: Episode 52

  • In this episode: So many people to thank and Chip of the Year

  • Chip Review: Kettle – Bourbon BBQ, Many thanks to Karin Zimmerman (13:45)

  • Trivia question of the week: In Gustav Holst’s The Planets, which planet is the Bringer of Old Age? (10:26)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

Huge thank you to everyone who came on the podcast this year. We can’t thank you enough for taking the time to share your knowledge, stories and insights.

 

Dr. Mike Pascoe – Episode 12

Ian Bosman – Episode 13

Robert Castillo – Episode 16

Stephanie Grover – Episode 30

Mary Carey – Episode 31

Peter Jennings – Episode 38

Dr. Mohammed Z. Rimawi – Episode 40

Amanda Turner Active Fueling – Episode 44

 

We also want to say thank you to everyone who provided chips this year. You guys have provided an amazing assortment of chips and we are incredibility appreciative.
Trent Cook
Matt Schneider
Lizzy Schneider
Steve Kovisto
Judy Kay
Patti Skiles
Ellen Bywaters
Pippa & Jamie
Hank
Becky and Dustin
Mary Carey
Kathleen Parker
McKenna Homner
Joan Saliman
Don Oberndorf
Aiden Bosman
Stephanie Grover
Khem Suthiwan
Skylar and his Mom Connie
Karin Zimmermann

Stress Fractures: Episode 43

  • In this episode: We cover stress fractures, or what would be called stress reactions, what they are, where they typically happen, what sports and activities most commonly cause them and some treatments.

  • Chip Review: Kettle – Maple Bacon (Stephanie Grover and Khem)

  • Trivia question of the week: In what sport would you perform the Fosbury Flop?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

 

Stress fractures not a good term. Lets start with that. It is a bit of a misnomer. It is not always a fracture. Just like people confuse fractures, breaks and cracks they are all kind of synonyms for the same word, a disruption of the bony structure.
But stress fractures are more of an irritation of the bone then an actual true fracture. Which is why they don’t tend to show up on x-rays. The more common vernacular is stress reaction.
Stress reaction is more closely associated with what is actually going on. There is a spot in the bone that is getting stressed. The body can’t quite cope with that stress and as a result you get a reaction. Pain is the main culprit that limits people. Pain, inflammation, muscle irritation, not usually a lot of swelling or visible irritation but pain is usually the first thing people notice. We discussed this a little bit when we did the shin splint episode.
Stress fractures or as we are going forward from here stress reactions are much more common in females. That is partly hormonal, partly to due with alignment, So excessive stresses and imbalances. What is interesting is there is more evidence to suggest varus malalignment (genu, tibial, subtalar and forefoot) versus valgus.
Varus meaning bow legged and valgus being knock kneed for lack of better terms.
At the Division 1 level females have a nearly 2:1 ration to have a stress reaction versus males. In the military this is almost a 3:1 ratio female to male. Running accounts for close to 50% of all case and you tend to see more stress reactions in the younger populations.
This could be due to activity but also to an immature skeleton. The most common is in the tibia (shin splint). Not as common but also seen is the femur, pelvis and the 5th metatarsal (outside of the foot).

Pain: Episode 29

  • Pain is something everyone experiences. Pain is unique to the individual and is difficult to quantify.

  • Today’s Chips: Kettle Brand – Salt and Fresh Ground Pepper – Thank You Judy Kay!

  • Trivia question of the week: What is the coldest temperature ever recorded in the contiguous United States?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

 

Rebound Therapy & Wellness Clinic has joined Team Grover for the Fight for Air Climb on March 3rd at Republic Plaza. This event raises money for the American Lung Association.

To learn more check out: https://action.lung.org/site/TR?fr_id=17508&pg=entry&_ga=2.8921013.1498938364.1547918000-523393982.1547225137

Team Grover: https://action.lung.org/site/TR/Climb/ALASW_Southwest?team_id=148799&pg=team&fr_id=17508

To donate: https://action.lung.org/ffaClimbFY19/dashboard.html?pc2_page=center&fr_id=17508

 

 

Today we are going to be discussing pain. That is a painful topic. We are going to review Kettle Brand Salt and Fresh Ground Pepper chips. Krinkle cut, Kris Krinkle cut? That is Kringle. Oh, yeah that would not work then. No that is different, easy to confuse. I can understand that.

 

Pain is an interesting thing. It is just your mind perceiving something. We all perceive that differently. Everyone is going to experience that a different way. When someone says that this is the worst pain I have ever felt, that could be true. There is somatic, visceral, chronic, acute, bone, muscle, radicular ( http://reboundclinic.com/radicular-pain/) to name a few.

 

The infamous scale right? The zero to ten scale. Zero no pain, ten the most pain you have ever had. People are always concerned about getting that one right. There honestly is no wrong. It is a relative scale. It is relative to you, to you only. If we ask you this week, you might be a zero and next week you might be a ten or a one. We are more concerned about the change in pain or establishing a baseline.

 

What is you pain level like today Djimmer? Zero. So if we start exercising and his pain goes up to four. Then maybe it is time to stop, or we are doing the wrong exercises.

 

We are also required to document this for insurance. Yeah that is where the whole scale came in. It is semi objective. There is also the Wong-Baker Faces scale. Which goes from happy face to really unhappy face.

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