FAI/Hip Labrum: Episode 21

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FAI/Hip Labrum: Episode 21

  • FAI (Femoral Acetabular Impingement) is becoming a common diagnosis. This is a bony change that causes the hip labrum to tear and fray. Both cause pain and loss of sport ability.
  • We review Kettle Brand Spicy Queso Potato Chips, compliments of Judy Kay.
  • Trivia question of the week: The Bullfinch Pub in Boston is better known by what name?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!
  Today we are going to be covering hip labrum pain, hip labrum tears, hip labrum reconstruction, femoral acetabular impingement (FAI), which all full under the same heading. Then we are going to be reviewing Kettle Brand Spicy Queso Chips, compliments of Ms. Judy Kay.  Thank you Mrs. Kay.   So we are going to start with labrum tears. So the labrum sits around the outside of your hip joint. It helps to deepen the joint; it helps improve stability around there. It is also chock full of pain fibers. It is kind of like a gasket. I learned that from Dr. Parker. You learned gaskets from Dr. Parker?   When you have irritation to that you will feel pinching, you will feel pain.  Most of the time pain with either be in the front of your hip or into your groin. Very common with people who are super flexible or single limb athletes as we call them if you do a lot of j ump, pushing off or landing on one leg. This is a pretty common injury. Although I think it is often, and this is speculation on my part, miss diagnosed. I has become one of those fade diagnosis. Everyone with anterior hip pain, now all of a sudden has FAI.   A lot of that has to do with the fact that there is now a surgery for it. The surgery is relatively routine. That has only been in the last 10 years. I remember treating a your lady 20 years ago. For hip impingement and there was not really any surgery at the time that could be done for it other then a complicated open procedure or a potential joint replacement. Neither one of those was a valiant option at the time. So we treated it conservatively and low and behold it got better.   We definitely see that a fair amount where you have a small tear and not need surgery. Even if you get diagnosed with a labrum tear, see it on imaging. If it is small enough you can treat it by stabilizing the joint. Treating it with physical therapy working on strength, balance, stability and range of motion.

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