The Final Episode: 140

  • The final episode of 2 Physical Therapist N’ a Bag of Chips. Double Chip review, trivia and a review of Season 3. As well as a look back at some of the high points of the podcast. After almost 9 years at Rebound, Christiaan has decided to take a job working as a physical therapist with the VA.
  • Chip Review @ (13:50): Kettle – Habanero Lime & Lays – Kettle Cooked – Extra Extreme Cheddar (both compliments of Tony Crea)
  • Trivia question of the week @ (10:28): What country does France share the longest boarder with?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Chip of the Year: Episode 52

Episode 100:

Season 2 Chip of the Year: Episode 104

“Pinched Nerve”

  • Pinched nerve is a term we have all heard but what is it really?
  • Chip Review @ (14:56): Trader Joe’s – Everything but the Bagel (Thanks Kate)
  • Trivia question of the week @ (12:28): What city was the first capital of the United States?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

Brief overview of the episode:

We’ve all heard the term pinched nerve before. But what does it really mean? It is not an official diagnosis but it does clearly present a set of symptoms. A “pinched nerve” is a loose term that describes radicular symptoms. This is pain and possibility numbness, tingling and weakness. This most often due to compression at the nerve root but can also occur distally along a nerve. Carpel tunnel and hitting your “funny bone” are both examples of a pinched nerve.

Most often a pinched nerve occurs due to a compression of the nerve root. Which is can be due to a number of changes. Most common are degenerative changes and this is why people 50 year and older are most affected. A pinched nerve occurs in about 85 out of 100,000 US adults. Making it a fairly common diagnosis.

One of the best ways to experience relief is by getting the area moving. This can be a few degrees of movement but so long as there is some movement taking place progress is being made.

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Spine Surgery Overview: Episode 80

Stenosis: Episode 36

Radicular Pain: Episode 22

 

Our Experiences with the COVID Vaccine

  • In this episode Djimmer and Christiaan discuss their specific experiences with going through the COVID vaccination process.
  • Chip Review @ (12:58): Lay’s India’s Magic Masala (Thank you Pope Family, Ava and Cameron)
  • Trivia question of the week @ (11:35): What is Oklahoma’s state vegetable?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

Brief overview of the episode:

Djimmer and Christiaan have been fortune enough to both be fully vaccinated. In this episode they discuss the very different responses that had to the vaccine. 

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Intro to Rebound Therapy and Wellness Clinic: Episode 1

Palmaris Longus

  • Palmaris Longus is a muscle this a absent in 14% of the worlds population. For people who have one it does not really seem to do that much though.
  • Chip Review @ (10:50): Lay’s – West Indies’ Hot ‘n’ Sweet Chilli (Khem)
  • Trivia question of the week @ (07:18): Which US state’s flag has more than 4 sides?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

Brief overview of the episode:

Palmaris Longus is a muscle in most peoples wrist/forearm. It is absent in 14% of the world population. Almost 64% of Turkish people don’t have one but only in 0.6% of Korean people is it absent.

The Palmaris longus works in conjunction with the other wrist flexors. It begins at the medial epicondyle and travels into the first few bones of the hand as well as the palmer aponeurosis.

When compared to cat anatomy this is the muscle that retracts its claws. There is very little strength for wrist flexion or gripping attributed to the Palmaris longus. As such it makes for a great tendon to harvest to help reconstruct other more useful tendon structus in the body.

The present of or absents of Palmaris longus can be bilateral or unilateral. It is a fun and unique muscle/tendon to discuss and has no know specific injury associated with it.

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex (TFCC): Episode 86

Colles’ Fracture: Episode 72

Wrist Pain: Episode 41

 

Cyclops Lesion

**Apologies for the poor audio quality. This episode was recorded long distance and there were some technical difficulties. **

 

  • Cyclops lesion is an uncommon complication most commonly related to ACL reconstruction surgery. It will typically presents as anterior knee pain and inability to fully extend the knee. Epis
  • Chip Review @ (11:54): Cape Cod – 40% Reduced Fat Original
  • Trivia question of the week @ (10:36): Where did the potato originate?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

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Brief overview of the episode:

A Cyclops lesion is a rare complication following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLr) surgery. Symptoms are hallmarked by anterior knee pain and loss of knee extension. The most likely follow up treatment for a Cyclops lesion is unfortunately another surgery to have it removed.

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

ACL Reconstruction Options: Episode 46

Patella Femoral Pain Syndrome: Episode 32

ACL Recovery: Episode 13

Failed Surgical Procedures

  • Failed surgeries are a tricky subject to discuss. What really does “failed” mean. Does it have to do with the surgery itself? Does it have to do with the results of surgery? Is it a combination?
  • Chip Review @ (21:58): Uhba Foods – Kulhi Faaja – from the Maldives (Thank you Khem)
  • Trivia question of the week @ (19:51): From which city was the Titanic launched?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

Brief overview of the episode:

This is a complex topic with multiple answer and responses. In this episode we take a fairly broad overview and give a few examples. It is in no way a definitive answer or solution.

We want to bring this up, as a bit of a thought experiment and to help remind people that surgery is just a part of a solution. Not always the correct stand along answer.

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

 Bunion (Hallux Valgus): Episode 124

Spine Surgery Overview: Episode 80

Pain: Episode 29

Previous Injury as a Risk Factor

  • Previous injury is one of the bigger risk factor for future injury.
  • Chip Review @ (13:05): Old Dutch – Dutch Crunch Original (Djimmer)
  • Trivia question of the week @ (10:06): What was the first vegetable grown in space?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

Brief overview of the episode:

Previous injury is a risk factor for future injury. There is some mixed research out there but for the most part previous injury does correlate to increased risk for injury.

In 2014 a systematic review by Fulton, Wright, Kelly, et al “Injury risk is alterad by repvious injury: a Systemic review of the literature and presenation of causative neuromuscular factor” appeared in the International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy. The result of this study: “ ACL injury was linked to a successive injury of the same ACL, and other injuries in the LE. HS was associated with subsequent ipsilateral HS and knee injuries. Previous achilles tendon rupture increased the risk of an analogous injury on the contralateral side. An ankle sprain was associated with a re‐injury of either the ipsilateral or the contralateral ankle. Post‐injury changes were present in strength, proprioception, and kinematics, which may have led to overall changes in motor control and function.”

A second study from 2005 By Kucera, Marshall, Kirkendall et al called “Injury History as a risk factor for incident injury in youth soccer” concluded, “Injury history was associated with an increased injury rate. This suggests that, even in these youth soccer players, those with an injury history may be at higher risk.” And further went on to state: “Multivariate generalised Poisson regression modeling indicated that players with one previous injury had a twofold greater risk of incident injury (IRR  =  2.6; 95% CI 2.0 to 3.3), and those with two or more previous injuries had a threefold greater risk of incident injury (IRR  =  3.0; 95% CI 2.3 to 3.8) compared with athletes with no previous injuries.

                 Both give strong evidence that previous injury is indeed a meaningful risk factor for future injury.

                 One of the best ways to help prevent injury is make sure that you are getting enough sleep as well as proper nutrition and hydration.

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Intro to Rebound Therapy and Wellness Clinic: Episode 1

Fall prevention & Balance: Episode 19

Stretching: Episode 25

Stem Cell Injection

  • Stem cell injections are being used to treat all sorts of conditions these days. But do they work and are they worth the out of pocket expense?
  • Chip Review @ (14:54): Lay’s – Salted Caramel (Thank You Judy Bloomburg)
  • Trivia question of the week @ (13:07): What is the deepest lake in United States?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

Brief overview of the episode:

Stem cell injections have been touted as a wonder treatment for things ranging from diabetes, ALS, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s to cancers, stokes and burns. A good deal of the success in treating these ailments has been in the laboratory.

The excitement about stem cell injections in the future is certainly warranted as a stemcell is an undifferentiated cell that can become any other type of cell, blood, brain, heart, bone, nerve, muscle. However, there are three main ways to harvest stem cells.

Most individuals think of stem cell and think they come from embryos, amniotic fluid and umbilical cord blood. This is true but stem cells can also be harvested from adult bone marrow. Harvesting from adult bone marrow is actual more common in the treatment of orthopedic injuries. There are however issues associated with that. Unlike embryonic and perinatal stem cells, adult stem cells are limited in their versatility. So far they have really only shown the ability to effectively treat diseases of the blood.

The future uses for stem cells in medicine is a very exciting and likely outcome but at this time we have not reached a point where positive results are been seen with every condition treated.

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Corticosteroids: Episode 122

Myofascial Tools: Episode 114

Role of Modalities in PT: Episode 90

 

Tommy John Surgery /

Ulnar Collateral Ligament (UCL) Reconstruction

  • Tommy John Surgery, an Ulnar Collateral ligament reconstruction of the elbow, is named for Tommy John. A man who pitched 26 Major League Baseball seasons from 1963-1989. He was the first pitcher to undergo the procedure in 1974 and was able to pitch another decade and a half.
  • Chip Review @ (14:19): Kettle Brand – Korean Barbeque (Thank you Peter Jennings)
  • Trivia question of the week @ (12:51): How many grooves are there on the edge of a quarter?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

 

Brief overview of the episode:

Tommy John has become synonymous with Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction (UCLR) and being just another common baseball injury. With this injury and subsequent surgical procedure we are talking about a ligament tear on the inside of the elbow.

This injury is most common with overhead athletes (think baseball, volleyball, tennis) and is the result of the repetitive overhead throwing motion that causes repetitive valgus stress on the elbow. Ulnar collateral ligament injury can also happen due to trauma. These would most commonly be due to a fall on out stretched hand (FOOSH) as well as a forced twisting of the arm.

In this podcast we dig into the research surround UCLR. Who will benefit most, what does this mean for MLB players, NCAA players as well as high school and younger? Is there a preferred technique, graft type and tear characteristic.

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Little League Elbow: Episode 130

Scapular Winging: Episode 91

Tennis Elbow and Golfers Elbow: Episode 7

 

 

Little League Elbow

  • Elbow pain is reported to affect between 20-26% of the little league baseball players in America. Making little league elbow the most common injury in little league baseball.
  • Chip Review @ (13:35): Sabritas – Tubros Flamas (Thank You Judy Bloomburg)
  • Trivia question of the week @ (11:07): How many dots are there on a pair of dice?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

Brief overview of the episode:

Elbow pain is reported to present in 20-25% of little leaguers. That is a really significant number. When up to a quarter all participants in an activity deal with a similar injury then it is certainly time to look into ways to limit that.

Little league elbow is due to repetative valgus overload due to the throwing motion. This affects pitcher more than position players but that does not rule out position players. Most often pain is located on the inside of the elbow. It can also present on the outside and the back as well.

This pain pattern occurs because there is tension strain on the medial structures of the elbow. The medial epicondyle, epicondylar apophyasis and the collateral ligament are tensioned and become stressed. On the lateral aspect of the elbow there are compressive forces on the radial head and the capitellum. More concerning is the stress that overhead throwing places on the growth plate. Damage to the growth plate can result in permanent deformation.

Most kids will present with pain, decreased throwing distance and velocity, swelling, loss of elbow range of motion (specifically straightening the elbow) and on x-ray there is often a change present. Recover times vary from 6 weeks to 3 months depending on the extent of damage.

The best treatment is also the best prevention. Work on mechanics, pitch counts, strengthening of the arm, shoulder and para-scapular muscles, as well as the rotator cuff, core and legs. It is also a good idea to avoid year round participation in a single sport.

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Core/Abdominal Wall: Episode 35

Stretching: Episode 25

Tennis Elbow and Golfers Elbow: Episode 7

 

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