Snapping Hip Syndrome

  • In this episode: Season 3 kicks off with Snapping Hip Syndrome. Which is typically a pain free snap felt and heard around either hip, it can be painful in some cases. There are three versions Internal (the most common), External which is more similar to iliotibial band syndrome and Intra-Articular which is related typical to pathology of the hip labrum.

  • Chip Review @ (10:29): Trader Joe’s – Patio Potato Chips

  • Trivia question of the week @ (09:13): What is the technical name for the hashtag (#)?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

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Brief overview of the episode:

           Snapping Hip Syndrome (Coxa Saltans) is, as the name suggests, characterized by a snapping sensation in the hip. In most cases this is painless but it can be painful. It is most common in athletes and dancers in their teens and twenties.

            There are 3 recognized kinds of snapping hip syndrome. The most common form is Internal – which is caused by the iliopsoas tendon sliding over the femoral head in most cases. The Ilipsoas can also slide over the iliopectineal ridge, the lesser trocanter or the iliopsoas bursa. The 2nd most likely is External – which is caused by the ilitibial tract sliding over the great trochanter (outside of hip). The least common and most problematic is Intra-articular – which will be caused by loose bodies in the hip or a labrum tear and is highlighted by locking and pain.

            In most cases snapping hip syndrome is a secondary, pain free, finding when performing an examination of a young athlete. It does not need to be treated specifically if it is non-painful and is not affecting function.

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

FAI/Hip Labrum: Episode 21

FAI/Hip Labrum: Episode 21

Hip Pain: Episode 15

 

Hip Flexor Strain

  • In this episode: Hip Flexor Strains are fairly common. They typically occur with sports that involve kicking, skating or lots of change of direction. They can be traumatic or chronic. Chronic injuries are most common with endurance activities like cycling and running.

  • Chip Review @ (12:30): Private Selection – General Tso’s Chicken

  • Trivia question of the week @ (10:52): In which year was the Tour de France first held?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

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Google Play:

Youtube: 

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Podbean: 

Spotify:

 

Brief overview of the episode:

            Hip flexor strain is a fairly common sports injury. Sports that involve kicking and skating are frequent elicitors as well as endurance sports like cycling and running. The most common symptom is pain in the front of the hip.

            Other symptoms can include pain with hip flexion or extension, weakness and tenderness. The most commonly bothered hip flexors are the iliopsoas and the rectus femoris muscles.

            Recovery time can range from a week to a few months. The severity and cause of injury are big factors. More chronic overuse strains are going to take a little longer on average. Minor sudden injuries will recover more quickly. It is important to limit irritation as much as possible initial and slowly return to the activity in a graded fashion.

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Stress Fractures: Episode 43

Greater Trochanteric Bursitis: Episode 28

FAI/Hip Labrum: Episode 21

 

Proximal Hamstring: Episode 75

  • In this episode: Having a pain in the butt? There is a good chance you are dealing with an injury to your proximal hamstring.

  • Chip Review: Joe Chips – Classic Sea Salt (11:48)

  • Trivia question of the week: – Who was the only bachelor President of the United States? (10:18)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

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Youtube: 

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Podbean: 

Brief overview of the episode:

         The proximal hamstring is the portion closest part to your buttocks. All three muscles of the hamstrings attach to the ischial tuberosity. Which is sometimes referred to as the sits bone. This is the bone you sit on when you are riding a bicycle. An injury to this area will feel like a pain in the buttocks.
          Injuries in this area can include tendonitis, tendonosis, avulsions and bursitis. These types of injuries tend to be more irritate and as such can become chronic.
          Mechanics of injury is the same for proximal hamstring injuries as it is for muscle belly or distal hamstring injuries. An eccentric contraction with the hip flexed and the knee extended. Putting the hamstring in it longest length. This is most common with slips and falls as well as from sports.
        Avulsion fractures of the ischial tuberosity are starting be to seen more often. With an avulsion a small portion of the bone is fractured off, but remains connected to the tendon. In most cases this can not be feel or seen without the use of an MRI. Best evidence at this time has found that most avulsions will heal without the need for surgical intervention.
         A good way to differentiate between an avulsion and tendonitis is when performing eccentric contractions of the hamstring. With repeated exercise a tendonitis will improve an avulsion however, will not.
         As with most injuries if you suspect some has occurred it is always a good idea to have it check out earlier rather than later to prevent it becoming a chronic issues that will take much longer to heal.

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS): Episode 9

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS): Episode 9

 

 

Hamstring Injuries: Episode 74

  • In this episode: We discuss hamstring injuries more broadly. The difference between grade I, II & III tears. Expected recovery times for each as well as muscle belly versus tendon injuries.

  • Chip Review: Croky – Paprika (Thank you Karin) (15:36)

  • Trivia question of the week: How many muscles in an elephant’s trunk? – (13:42)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

Apple Podcasts:

Google Play:

Youtube: 

Stitcher: 

Podbean: 

Brief overview of the episode:

           Hamstring injuries you hear about strains, tears, pulls, tendonitis, tendonosis, ruptures and avulsions. The general signs and symptoms are going to be pain in the back of the thigh. Typically this is sharp and sudden during an activity (sports, slips and falls). This will be followed by days of soreness, likely bruising, weakness, tenderness, and difficulty weight bearing or walking. Usually the first few steps after sitting will be the most uncomfortable. In high-grade cases sitting itself will be uncomfortable.
            Anatomically the hamstrings are comprised of the semimembranosus and semitendinosus on the medial aspect of the posterior thigh and the biceps femoris on the lateral aspect. The semimembranosus and semitendinosus will feel like a single muscle when palpated. Injuries can occur to all three. Because there are three distinct muscle there an injury to 1 will not prevent active knee flexion. It will weaken it and make it painful.
            Tears will be graded based on severity. Grade I tears are more mild and are often called strains. Grade II tears will be partial thickness tears and Grade III tears will be full thickness tears or ruptures.
            Grade I tears will heal within 3 weeks in most cases. Grade II tears can take up to 3 months and Grade III tears can be 9 months or longer. The greatest risk factor in sustaining a hamstring injury is a prior hamstring injury. Therefor it is important to take your time to full recovery from any hamstring injury.
            In most cases an injury to your hamstring is a result of a muscle imbalance. Either there is meaningful difference between your quadriceps strength and hamstring strength or, more likely, there is a weakness with hip abduction and/or external rotation. These muscle imbalances will cause the hamstring to over work and result in the injury.

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Fall prevention & Balance: Episode 19

Stretching: Episode 25

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS): Episode 9

 

Sciatica: Episode 34

  • In this episode: We cover Sciatica as it relates to the general population as well as during pregnancy. We also touch on piriformis syndrome and what “double crush” is.

  • Chip Review: Calbee Seaweed & Salt Potato Chips, Huge thank you again to Steve Kovisto

  • Trivia question of the week: What 2 US states have their own time zones?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

In this episode we are going to go over sciatica and will be reviewing the Calbee Seaweed & Salt Potato Chip.
Sciatica, typically people have low back pain and pain in the buttocks. Pain can then extend into the knee or as far as the foot. Following the path of the sciatic nerve distribution. Sciatica affects men and women pretty much equally. It does not have an age range that is really prevalent. You kind of see it across the age ranges. Something that crops up during pregnancy, we will get into sciatica and pregnancy a little later in the episode.
The biggest cause for sciatica is a herniated disk, also nerve root irritation or compression on the nerve. Imaging can be helpful but it does not tell you the whole story. If you have sciatica symptoms and they take an x-ray or MRI and they see something. Don’t panic, don’t freak out. The chances that what is there having just shown up are pretty darn low. Occasionally there can be trauma and sciatic can follow that. But most of the time or a lot of the time this is something that is non-irritable for a period of time. Then something happens and you have symptoms.
There is this thing called “double crush” syndrome. Which means that if you have irritation of the nerve anywhere in your body. But it is not enough to have symptoms. Then you get a second irritation somewhere else along that nerve. Now you get symptoms. With sciatica this is often at the piriformis muscle. Which is right in the center of your buttocks.

Other episodes you might find useful:

 

Upper and Lower Extremity Posture: Episode 8

 

Low Back Pain: Episode14

Hip Pain: Episode 15

Radicular Pain: Episode 22

Greater Trochanteric Bursitis: Episode 28

Pain: Episode 29

 

Joint Replacement: Episode 33

  • In this episode we discuss joint replacement broadly. We cover the 3 primary joints that get replaced, Shoulder, Hip & Knee. Then touch on some of the lesser-known joints.

  • Chip Review: Paqui – Haunted Ghost Pepper compliments of Becky & Dustin

  • Trivia question of the week: Which city was the first to reach 1 million inhabitants?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

Today we are discussing joint replacement. The large version, all versions. All joint replacements. Covering them as a whole. And reviewing the Paqui Haunted Ghost Pepper chips compliments of Becky and Dustin. Thank you Becky and Dustin for trying to kill us. The bag says “Freakin’ Hot” on it so… Actually right now they are melting through the tissue we put them on. I’m not kidding. They are really red.

 

Hey we had fun in Chicago. We did. For those of you who listened to last week’s episode, we realize that the quality was not all that good. But boy was it fun. Now we are back in our friendly confines.

 

Joint replacement, there are 3 main types. Shoulder, hip and knee. Those are all the same type just at three different joints. Yeah, yeah, yeah, those are the main ones. Correct. There are some, elbow, ankle relatively new, toe, finger, thumb have been around for a long time. They don’t really fit the… They are not common. The stuff we are going to be talking about.

 

I’ve seen a couple ankles, they are different. Tend not to do very well. They are still in the experimental phase I think. Plus it’s an alternative to fusing the ankle. So I guess it all depends on how you define function. Do I want my ankle fused or do I want to see if the ankle replacement will give me some relief.

 

Shoulder, probably the most uncomfortable of the group. Huh? When you have the shoulder replacement. I think the knee is more uncomfortable. People with knee joint replacements complain all the time of pain. I think the knee is hardest. I think having your shoulder replaced, up by your head, trying to sleep, all that throbbing early on, it gets better sooner. Most of these people can’t lie down, they sleep in a chair, they sleep in a reclined position. Which is advisable at first. They are all uncomfortable.

 

Hip is the easiest. By far and this is not based on our experience this is based on our clients experience. Over the course of the last 30 years hip replacement is by far the easiest. People recovery really well, really quick. Regardless of the approaches.

 

For additional episode recommendations check out:

Knee Pain: Episode 2

Shoulder Pain: Episode 4

Hip Pain: Episode 15

Pain: Episode 29

  • Pain is something everyone experiences. Pain is unique to the individual and is difficult to quantify.

  • Today’s Chips: Kettle Brand – Salt and Fresh Ground Pepper – Thank You Judy Kay!

  • Trivia question of the week: What is the coldest temperature ever recorded in the contiguous United States?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

 

Rebound Therapy & Wellness Clinic has joined Team Grover for the Fight for Air Climb on March 3rd at Republic Plaza. This event raises money for the American Lung Association.

To learn more check out: https://action.lung.org/site/TR?fr_id=17508&pg=entry&_ga=2.8921013.1498938364.1547918000-523393982.1547225137

Team Grover: https://action.lung.org/site/TR/Climb/ALASW_Southwest?team_id=148799&pg=team&fr_id=17508

To donate: https://action.lung.org/ffaClimbFY19/dashboard.html?pc2_page=center&fr_id=17508

 

 

Today we are going to be discussing pain. That is a painful topic. We are going to review Kettle Brand Salt and Fresh Ground Pepper chips. Krinkle cut, Kris Krinkle cut? That is Kringle. Oh, yeah that would not work then. No that is different, easy to confuse. I can understand that.

 

Pain is an interesting thing. It is just your mind perceiving something. We all perceive that differently. Everyone is going to experience that a different way. When someone says that this is the worst pain I have ever felt, that could be true. There is somatic, visceral, chronic, acute, bone, muscle, radicular ( http://reboundclinic.com/radicular-pain/) to name a few.

 

The infamous scale right? The zero to ten scale. Zero no pain, ten the most pain you have ever had. People are always concerned about getting that one right. There honestly is no wrong. It is a relative scale. It is relative to you, to you only. If we ask you this week, you might be a zero and next week you might be a ten or a one. We are more concerned about the change in pain or establishing a baseline.

 

What is you pain level like today Djimmer? Zero. So if we start exercising and his pain goes up to four. Then maybe it is time to stop, or we are doing the wrong exercises.

 

We are also required to document this for insurance. Yeah that is where the whole scale came in. It is semi objective. There is also the Wong-Baker Faces scale. Which goes from happy face to really unhappy face.

Greater Trochanteric Bursitis: Episode 28

  • The most common of all the bursitises affects the left or right hip and disproportionally in people over 60 years old.

  • Today’s Chips: Old Dutch Crunch – Jalapeno & Cheddar Kettle Chips

  • Trivia question of the week: “The Diary of a Young Girl” is better known by what name?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

Rebound Therapy & Wellness Clinic has joined Team Grover for the Fight for Air Climb on March 3rd at Republic Plaza. This event raises money for the American Lung Association.

To learn more check out: https://action.lung.org/site/TR?fr_id=17508&pg=entry&_ga=2.8921013.1498938364.1547918000-523393982.1547225137

Team Grover: https://action.lung.org/site/TR/Climb/ALASW_Southwest?team_id=148799&pg=team&fr_id=17508

To donate: https://action.lung.org/ffaClimbFY19/dashboard.html?pc2_page=center&fr_id=17508

 

 

Today we’ve had to do an impromptu adjustment due to some unforeseeable circumstances related to automobiles. So rather than interviewing Mary Carey today we are going to be going over Greater Trochanteric Bursitis.

 

So greater trochanteric bursitis, it’s a great diagnosis. It is the most common of the bursitises. This is pain experienced on the outside of the hip. This could be left or right. It is most common on individuals sixty years and over. We do see it younger on occasion. On a Cajun. We should have done Cajun chips, what were we thinking.

 

It is a very common diagnosis; unfortunately if you have pain on the outside of the hip most people will say you have greater trochanteric bursitis. There is often some differential diagnosis needed when you get a prescription for great trochanteric bursitis because that is not always the case (http://reboundclinic.com/hip-pain/).

 

We see it a lot. People who sit often and then stand up with pain in their hip. The pain can travel down the side to the knee almost looking like an iliotibial band issue (http://reboundclinic.com/iliotibial-band-syndrome/) at times. It is pretty common in patients who are compensating for osteoarthritis in the hip. So if you see somebody walking with a lateral shift or lateral lean that can create irritability. A lot of the times like tendonitis or other bursitis it is a result of a compensatory problem.

 

Other common chronic conditions with it are scoliosis, leg length discrepancy, and weakness of the hip musculature is a huge one in general. And then OA and RA, which you already mentioned. Overuse people who all of a sudden have discovered the stair master for their cardiovascular exercise are a target demographic. Or individuals who suddenly start exercising or doing a new activity.

FAI/Hip Labrum: Episode 21

  • FAI (Femoral Acetabular Impingement) is becoming a common diagnosis. This is a bony change that causes the hip labrum to tear and fray. Both cause pain and loss of sport ability.
  • We review Kettle Brand Spicy Queso Potato Chips, compliments of Judy Kay.
  • Trivia question of the week: The Bullfinch Pub in Boston is better known by what name?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

 

Today we are going to be covering hip labrum pain, hip labrum tears, hip labrum reconstruction, femoral acetabular impingement (FAI), which all full under the same heading. Then we are going to be reviewing Kettle Brand Spicy Queso Chips, compliments of Ms. Judy Kay.  Thank you Mrs. Kay.

 

So we are going to start with labrum tears. So the labrum sits around the outside of your hip joint. It helps to deepen the joint; it helps improve stability around there. It is also chock full of pain fibers. It is kind of like a gasket. I learned that from Dr. Parker. You learned gaskets from Dr. Parker?

 

When you have irritation to that you will feel pinching, you will feel pain.  Most of the time pain with either be in the front of your hip or into your groin.

Very common with people who are super flexible or single limb athletes as we call them if you do a lot of j ump, pushing off or landing on one leg. This is a pretty common injury. Although I think it is often, and this is speculation on my part, miss diagnosed. I has become one of those fade diagnosis. Everyone with anterior hip pain, now all of a sudden has FAI.

 

A lot of that has to do with the fact that there is now a surgery for it. The surgery is relatively routine. That has only been in the last 10 years. I remember treating a your lady 20 years ago. For hip impingement and there was not really any surgery at the time that could be done for it other then a complicated open procedure or a potential joint replacement. Neither one of those was a valiant option at the time. So we treated it conservatively and low and behold it got better.

 

We definitely see that a fair amount where you have a small tear and not need surgery. Even if you get diagnosed with a labrum tear, see it on imaging. If it is small enough you can treat it by stabilizing the joint. Treating it with physical therapy working on strength, balance, stability and range of motion.

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