Proximal Hamstring: Episode 75

  • In this episode: Having a pain in the butt? There is a good chance you are dealing with an injury to your proximal hamstring.

  • Chip Review: Joe Chips – Classic Sea Salt (11:48)

  • Trivia question of the week: – Who was the only bachelor President of the United States? (10:18)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

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Brief overview of the episode:

         The proximal hamstring is the portion closest part to your buttocks. All three muscles of the hamstrings attach to the ischial tuberosity. Which is sometimes referred to as the sits bone. This is the bone you sit on when you are riding a bicycle. An injury to this area will feel like a pain in the buttocks.
          Injuries in this area can include tendonitis, tendonosis, avulsions and bursitis. These types of injuries tend to be more irritate and as such can become chronic.
          Mechanics of injury is the same for proximal hamstring injuries as it is for muscle belly or distal hamstring injuries. An eccentric contraction with the hip flexed and the knee extended. Putting the hamstring in it longest length. This is most common with slips and falls as well as from sports.
        Avulsion fractures of the ischial tuberosity are starting be to seen more often. With an avulsion a small portion of the bone is fractured off, but remains connected to the tendon. In most cases this can not be feel or seen without the use of an MRI. Best evidence at this time has found that most avulsions will heal without the need for surgical intervention.
         A good way to differentiate between an avulsion and tendonitis is when performing eccentric contractions of the hamstring. With repeated exercise a tendonitis will improve an avulsion however, will not.
         As with most injuries if you suspect some has occurred it is always a good idea to have it check out earlier rather than later to prevent it becoming a chronic issues that will take much longer to heal.

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS): Episode 9

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS): Episode 9

 

 

Achilles Tendonitis: Episode 48

  • In this episode: We discuss Achilles Tendonitis

  • Chip Review: Chio – Sweet Chili & Red Pepper (13:40)

  • Trivia question of the week: Which 2 US states boarder 8 other states? (13:17)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

Achilles tendonitis is the topic today. Before we get to far into that here is a brief overview of the Achilles.

 

The Achilles is the largest tendon in the body, it is one of the toughest to tear. We did a whole podcast on Achilles Repair. The Achilles is the attachment for the gastrocnemius, a two joint muscle, and the soleus (one joint muscle). These muscles make up the two layers of the calf. The gastrocnemius is the fast twitch muscle and the soleous is the slow twitch. Both muscles are innervated by the tibial nerve.
The group as a whole is responsible for forced plantar flexion, also known as push-off as well as eccentric dorsi-flexion aka landing. You will see Achilles tendonitis fairly often in a few groups of individuals.
Runners are the most commonly affected group. You also see Achilles tendonitis with impact sports such as basketball, tennis, lacrosse, soccer and volleyball. There is a good deal of research that has found that increased BMI also plays a role.
Some differential diagnosis is often appropriate when given a diagnosis of Achilles tendonitis. With younger ages, people who are going through a growth spurt, you will sometimes see Sever’s Disease diagnosed as Achilles tendonitis. Sever’s is similar to Osgood-Schlatter’s disease at the heel instead of the knee. With an older population you can see calcaneal bursitis and rarely a partial Achilles tear or calf strain.
If left untreated a tendonitis can become a tendonosis. A tendonosis is much harder to treat. This is a chronic condition that is no longer in the inflammatory stage. Our recommendation with tendonitis is to treat it early and not to let it get out of hand. Physical therapy is a great tool in managing and treating Achilles tendonitis.

Check out our other podcast with similar topics:

Foot & Ankle Health with Dr. Mohammad Rimawi: Episode 40

Achilles Repair with Peter Jennings: Episode 38

Plantar Fasciitis: Episode 11

Ankle Sprain_Inversion Type: Episode 3

 

Biceps Tendonitis: Episode 24

  • One of the most common complaints around the shoulder is Biceps Tendonitis. This pain presents in the front of the shoulder and responds well to treatment.
  • We review The Daily Crave Lentil Chips Smoked Gouda – Complements of Pip & Jamie
  • Trivia question of the week: When was the first year that the ball was dropped at Times Square, New York?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

Today we are going to cover biceps tendonitis. Yes. Then we are also going to go over The Daily Crave Lentil Chips, Smoked Gouda Flavor. Biceps tendonitis, quite common. Very common, in the shoulder, yes. A lot of people think of this more as a shoulder issue. We know of our biceps tendon in the upper arm there but. The tendon, tendonitis is felt right there in the front portion of the shoulder. Yeah it’s the long head of the biceps that tends to be the predominent culprit.

 

It runs through a grove, the biceps grove. Also called the bicipital groove. As it subluxes, or kind of rolls in and out of that it can get irritated. Happens with repetitive overuse. Like repetitive overhand motion; serving in tennis, swimming. Throwing the baseball. What have you. There is another issue with that.

 

Sometimes it spontaneously ruptures, in specifically elderly men. If it rupture completely it is no big deal. It just kind of curls back and you end up with what is called a “Popeye” arm. It looks very cool. Tends to be painful for maybe a couple days and some bruising. Then the pain goes away and off you go it’s more problematic if you have a partial tendon tear because they tend to be quite painful

 

They do indeed. That’s because you kind of are pulling on a hangnail, that is the best way to think of it. Really uncomfortable, you kind of catch it all the time. Gives you some sharp pains. But once you kind of rip that hangnail off, like when you fully rupture it. Sore for a day or two, three days. Then you are good; maybe some bruising for a little while but that is OK.

 

Biceps tendonitis is really common. I don’t have a specific number, maybe 50% of shoulder irritation. Yeah, even if you have an underlying rotator cuff issue or shoulder impingement a lot of times the biceps is involved because it is really important in shoulder mechanics.

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