Clubfoot

  • Clubfoot is a rare congenital defect that occurs in about 1 in 1000 births. In this episode we discuss treatment and how clubfoot can have affects across the lifespan.
  • Chip Review @ (14:56): Ripples by Old Dutch – Appetizers on the Go – BBQ Pulled Pork Wrap
  • Trivia question of the week @ (12:28): Where is the deepest hot spring in the world?
  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.
  • Thanks for listening!!

 

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Brief overview of the episode:

             Clubfoot is a rare, affects 1 in 1000 births, defect with no known specific cause. What is known is that children can develop this while in utero or shortly following birth. Presentation is of a severely inward turning of the foot. This can be so significant that the foot is turned upwards.

             With clubfoot the tendons of the Achilles and inverts of the foot are shorter than they should be. In most cases this can be treated with a combination of stretching, taping, bracing, splinting, casting and in 90% of cases some kind of surgery.

              Surgery is most commonly a procedure called a tenotomy. During this procedure a small cut is made in the Achilles followed by a case or splint to allow the tendon to stretch.

              Treatment for clubfoot is best done early and often with a baby. There can unfortunately be cases that go untreated or undertreated and result in more significantly structural changes that can only be correct with extension surgery later on in life. Unlike many orthopedic injuries clubfoot affects babies and as a result it becomes a family process to address the aforementioned issues.

 

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Calf Tear: Episode 94

Foot & Ankle Health with Dr. Mohammad Rimawi: Episode 40

Fall prevention & Balance: Episode 19

Calf Tear

  • In this episode: We discuss calf tears. The calf is made up of 2 muscles, the gastrocnemius and soleus. Sometime referred to as the gastroc-soleus complex because the muscle work together. Calf tears are more common to the gastrocnemius.

  • Chip Review @ (12:08): Zapp’s – Evil Eye (Thank you Connie)

  • Trivia question of the week @ (10:00): How many countries have purple in their flags?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

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Brief overview of the episode:

            The calf is official known as the gastroc-soleus complex. This is because it is made up of two separate muscles. The gastrocnemius which is a fast twitch, 2 joint power muscle and the soleus which is slow joint ankle joint only, endurance and stability muscle.

            It is possible to tear either muscle however, it is much more common to injure the gastrocnemius. The most typical mechanism of injury is a sudden change or direction. Common seen with starts and stops. It is rare to tear a calf muscle during steady state walking or jogging. That is more likely a muscle cramp.

            Calf tears and Achilles ruptures share a similar injury story. Most people will say they though someone kicked them or an object hit the back of their calf. The best way to tell these two injuries apart is to assess the Achilles tendon. With a calf tear pain is typically closer to the knee and an individual will have difficult placing their foot flat on the ground. With an Achilles pain will be lower and the pt will not be able to place only their forefoot on the ground, because the ability to plantar flex the ankle has mostly been lost.

            There are three grades of tears. Grade I is fairly mild and will typical recover in 2-3 weeks. Grade II is moderate and can take 4-8 weeks. Grade III is sever and can sometimes take 2-4 months to fully recover.

            We have found that calf tears at any grade can be finicky to recover from. They more than most other injuries can easily become chronic when not treated effectively.

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Ankle Sprain_Inversion Type: Episode 3

Posterior Tibial Tendonitis: Episode 87

Ankle Sprain_Inversion Type: Episode 3

Achilles Repair with Peter Jennings: Episode 38

Retrocalcaneal Bursitis/Achilles Bursitis

  • In this episode: Officially known as retrocalcaneal bursitis, this is heel pain usually brought on by a sudden change in activity level, trauma or wearing high heels.

  • Chip Review @ (09:04): Dirty Chips – Funky Fusion (Thanks Pip and Jamie)

  • Trivia question of the week @ (06:03): What is the only word in the English language that ends in “mt”?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

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Google Play:

Youtube: 

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Podbean: 

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Brief overview of the episode:

The sign of retrocalcaneal bursitis/Achilles bursitis is heel pain. Which is most often brought on by a sudden increase in activity. Most commonly that is activities that are high in running or jumping. It can also be caused by blunt trauma or from wearing high heels.

Thankfully when treated early retrocalcaneal bursitis can resolved in as little as 2-3 weeks. If the situation has gone on for a long time and there is now visible signs of inflammation (redness, heat, fluid) present it can take 6 weeks or longer to resolve. 

Most individuals can make a full recovery by participating in physical therapy where early rest and anti-inflammatory modalities are used. Followed by a course of exercises that would included, strengthening, balance, motor control and return to function.

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Stretching: Episode 25

Ankle Sprain_Inversion Type: Episode 3

Foot & Ankle Health with Dr. Mohammad Rimawi: Episode 40

 

Sever’s Disease: Episode 54

  • In this episode: Sever’s disease – Is your child experiencing heel pain, especially during sport or after.

  • Chip Review: Lorenz – Crunchips Cheese & Onion – Thank you Steve Kovisto (11:05)

  • Trivia question of the week: Can you name the two state capitals, which contain the entire name of the state in their spelling? (09:25)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below:

Apple Podcasts:
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Brief except from the episode:
Sever’s Disease aka calcaneal apophysitis, juvinille heel pain. It is inflammation of the growth plate of the calcaneus (heel bone).
This is most common in kids going through a growth spurt. Age 12 is the most likely age but it can occur before or after. Boys are more likely then girls to present with this pain.
Almost always pain is produced during physical activity and particularly sports. Pain will linger after and can settle down with a few minutes or hours. Pain always returns with participation in sport again.
Running and jumping sports are the most common. However, it can be seen with any sport depending on activity level.
This issue can be present for several weeks or months and will typical resolve on its own once the bones slow down or stop growing. That is why it is so common during a growth spurt.
Essential what happens is that the pull of the Achilles tendon on the immature skeleton causes the bone to deform. You can sometimes see a more prominent heel bone in adults who as children dealt with Sever’s Disease.
Other episodes you might enjoy:

Achilles Tendonitis: Episode 48

Foot & Ankle Health with Dr. Mohammad Rimawi: Episode 40

Plantar Fasciitis: Episode 11

Achilles Tendonitis: Episode 48

  • In this episode: We discuss Achilles Tendonitis

  • Chip Review: Chio – Sweet Chili & Red Pepper (13:40)

  • Trivia question of the week: Which 2 US states boarder 8 other states? (13:17)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

Achilles tendonitis is the topic today. Before we get to far into that here is a brief overview of the Achilles.

 

The Achilles is the largest tendon in the body, it is one of the toughest to tear. We did a whole podcast on Achilles Repair. The Achilles is the attachment for the gastrocnemius, a two joint muscle, and the soleus (one joint muscle). These muscles make up the two layers of the calf. The gastrocnemius is the fast twitch muscle and the soleous is the slow twitch. Both muscles are innervated by the tibial nerve.
The group as a whole is responsible for forced plantar flexion, also known as push-off as well as eccentric dorsi-flexion aka landing. You will see Achilles tendonitis fairly often in a few groups of individuals.
Runners are the most commonly affected group. You also see Achilles tendonitis with impact sports such as basketball, tennis, lacrosse, soccer and volleyball. There is a good deal of research that has found that increased BMI also plays a role.
Some differential diagnosis is often appropriate when given a diagnosis of Achilles tendonitis. With younger ages, people who are going through a growth spurt, you will sometimes see Sever’s Disease diagnosed as Achilles tendonitis. Sever’s is similar to Osgood-Schlatter’s disease at the heel instead of the knee. With an older population you can see calcaneal bursitis and rarely a partial Achilles tear or calf strain.
If left untreated a tendonitis can become a tendonosis. A tendonosis is much harder to treat. This is a chronic condition that is no longer in the inflammatory stage. Our recommendation with tendonitis is to treat it early and not to let it get out of hand. Physical therapy is a great tool in managing and treating Achilles tendonitis.

Check out our other podcast with similar topics:

Foot & Ankle Health with Dr. Mohammad Rimawi: Episode 40

Achilles Repair with Peter Jennings: Episode 38

Plantar Fasciitis: Episode 11

Ankle Sprain_Inversion Type: Episode 3

 

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