Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex (TFCC): Episode 86

  • In this episode: TFCC is a structure on the outside of the wrist that helps to maintain stability. It can be injured during a fall or with repetitive movements like those from racket, stick and bat sports.

  • Chip Review @ (10:30): Lay’s of Thailand – Mieng Kam Krob Ros (Khem thank you so much)

  • Trivia question of the week @ (09:10): Which plants in our solar system don’t have moons?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

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Brief overview of the episode:

            Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex (TFCC) is an easy way to refer to the structures that makes up the connection between the medial forearm and wrist bones. In this case medial is the side of the wrist nearest the little finger. There are more than a dozen bones, ligaments, tendons, and disc like structures that make up the TFCC. This is why it is much easier to refer to as simply the TFCC.
            Injury to the TFCC occurs typically in 3 ways. Trauma, usually due to slip and fall, repetitive motions from sports involving, bats, rackets, sticks and clubs or long term degeneration.
            Most often the initial treatment involves stopping the causes of the injury and supporting the TFCC. This can be done either with some sort of brace or wrap or in some cases a specially made splint. Surgery can be an option though due to the small size of the TFCC is difficult and may not be more successful than long duration immobilization. It is not uncommon for healing to take 6 months or more regardless of surgery being performed or not.
            The most common symptoms of TFCC injury are pain with turning a door handle. Ulnar sided wrist pain and tenderness, weakness with wrist movements and grip strength and sometimes clicking but more specifically painful clicking of the wrist.
            If you suspect you have a TFCC injury come on in to see us or any other physical therapist or orthopedist and have it checked out. The sooner you can begin to recover from a TFCC injury the sooner you will be ready to get back to your favorite activities.

 

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Fall prevention & Balance: Episode 19

Radicular Pain: Episode 22

Intro to Rebound Therapy and Wellness Clinic: Episode 1

 

Carpel Tunnel Syndrome: Episode 65

  • In this episode: Carpel Tunnel Syndrome – symptoms, causes, types of treatment and who you should see first for treatment (it’s your local physical therapist).

  • Chip Review: Burts – Guinness (10:36)

  • Trivia question of the week: What is the national animal of Scotland? (08:57)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

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Google Play:

Youtube: 

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Brief except from the episode:

 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is common. The big symptoms are tingling, numbness, pain and weakness in the hand. Symptoms are caused by compression of the median nerve. Historically this was thought as solely due to compression at the carpel tunnel, your wrist.
What we have found is that typically symptoms are caused by what is called a double crush. This means there is compression on the nerve at multiple sites. Most often at the neck and wrist. But compression can also occur at the shoulder or elbow as well.
Treatment wise we tend to work on mobility, especially at the neck and wrist. It is also important work on strength. Mostly of postural muscles shoulder, neck and upper back. Manual therapy at the wrist , neck, elbow and shoulder can also be beneficial.
In the past nerve gliding was thought to be a highly valuable treatment but over the last few years the evidence does not support its use. At times someone might benefit from it but it is no longer a go to treatment technique.
Carpel Tunnel Syndrome is sometimes treated with surgery. What is becoming apparent is that most cases do not benefit from surgery anymore then they do for physical therapy alone.
If you suspect you are dealing with Carpel Tunnel Syndrome go to your local physical therapist and have it checked out. The sooner you can take compression off the median nerve the sooner you will start to feel better.

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Intro to Rebound Therapy and Wellness Clinic: Episode 1

Intro to Rebound Therapy and Wellness Clinic: Episode 1

Radicular Pain: Episode 22

 

De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

  • In this episode: De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis Pain on the thumb side of the wrist. It is most common in new parents and those who perform repeated wrist motions.

  • Chip Review: Snatt’s – Queso Y Eneldo (11:20)

  • Trivia question of the week: Who was the first person in space? (09:02)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

Apple Podcasts:

Google Play:

Youtube: 

Stitcher: 

Podbean: 

Brief except from the episode:

De Quervains Tenosynovitis, pain on the thumb side of the wrist. Officially it is inflammation of the sheath surrounding the tendons of the thumb. The Abductor Pollicis and the Extensor Pollicis Longus. Which also makes up what is called the “Anatomical Snuffbox”.
If you make a thumbs up, there will be two tendons present, these are Abductor Pollicis and Extensor Pollicis Longus. The space between them is the “Anatomical Snuffbox”.
Typically De Quervains Tenosynovitis is pretty painful. It is however, easy to use the Finkelsteins test to assess if you have De Quervains Tenosynovitis on your own (Click for video).
If you are dealing with De Quervains Tenosynovitis hopefully it is still early on. Typically these symptoms come around quickly, if you take care of them early they will go away quickly. Don’t let these symptoms linger!
Other episodes you might enjoy:

Wrist Pain: Episode 41

Tennis Elbow and Golfers Elbow: Episode 7

Intro to Rebound Therapy and Wellness Clinic: Episode 1

Wrist Pain: Episode 41

  • In this episode: We discuss common types of wrist pain, how to assess yourself as well as their causes and some treatment options.

  • Chip Review: Kettle Honey Dijon – Don Oberdorf

  • Trivia question of the week: Originally from Quebec, what food comes from the French slang word for “mess”?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

Today we are going to discuss wrist pain and then review the Kettle Honey Dijon chips compliments of Don Obendorf.
Wrist pain. All sorts of wrist pain, the most common one we see is probably going to be wrist fractures. The other one we see pretty often is Dequervains tenosinovitis, one of the funnier ones to say and try to spell. Other common ones are carpel tunnel, osteoarthritis, overuse, trauma; sports trauma in particularly guys and girls jamming their wrist playing football, basketball, lacrosse, volleyball.
Dequervains tenosinovitis we see most often with new parents, most often moms but dads as well. Last week I saw a guy who just got a new puppy and he gave himself Dequervains. This is basically pain at the base of your thumb. This hurts the most when you do wrist deviation, specifically radial deviations. That is movement toward the thumb side of the hand.
The test for Dequervains tenosinovitis has a fantastic name, the Finkelstein test. To perform this test you take your thumb and wrap it with the other fingers and then turn your hand away from the thumb side. If that hurts a lot the base of the thumb and wrist then you have Dequervains. This is a pretty distinct test, if it is positive you will know. Dequervains is basically tendonitis of the thumb extensors.
Carpel tunnel is a well know wrist injury. Which is in a lot of cases not just at the wrsit. You get the double crush, which means something is happening at your neck as well as your elbow and wrist. It’s an easy one to miss diagnosis because if you have symptoms in your hands this is what it gets diagnosed as. Typically with this I will treat the neck. Treating the neck as well as some gentle neural glides is typically all you need. Surgery is out there and if properly diagnosed will be effect.
Arthritis, overuse and trauma are the other ones we treat the most. With these the testing and patient specific needs and goals will dictate how they need to be treated.

 

Other episodes you may enjoy:

Tennis Elbow and Golfers Elbow: Episode 7

Intro to Rebound Therapy and Wellness Clinic: Episode 1

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