Ankylosing Spondylitis

  • In this episode: Ankylosing Spondylitis is an autoimmune disorder that affects the spine, eyes and heart. With physical therapy the biggest concern is fusion of spinal segments. Usually beginning in near the sacrum and lumbar spines. Its biggest concern is loss of rib cage expansion limiting respiration.

  • Chip Review @ (13:07): Frozen – Utz Crab Chips (Thank you Linda Payne)

  • Trivia question of the week @ (11:56): Which dinosaur’s name translates to “fused-lizard”?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

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Brief overview of the episode:

            Ankylosing Spondylitis is a rare auto-immune disease that predominantly affects the spine. It causes the spine to fuse along its length. Fusion typically begin near the SI joint though the biggest concern is when it causes the costoverterbal (ribcage) joints to fuse. This prevents typical respiration. There are additional affects on the eyes as well as the heart.

            When treating someone who has Ankylosing Spondylitis the main goal is to prevent the spine from fusing in a hunched posture. This limits loss of function, improves respiration and limits the impact on daily life that can occur when left untreated.

            Physical therapy is provided in conjunction with medication. As Ankylosing Spondylitis falls under the rheumatic diseases it has been found to have a common genetic component. Individuals who have Ankylosing Spondylitis presents with the HLA – B28 gene 95% of the time. Having the HLA-B28 gene is not however, a diagnosis as most individuals with it will not present with symptoms of Ankylosing Spondylitis.

            The prevalence is about 0.1-0.2% of the population. It affects men 3x as often as women and is most likely to affect white individuals.

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Discectomy: Episode 81

Stretching: Episode 25

Stress Fractures: Episode 43

 

 

Spine Fusion: Episode 83

  • In this episode: A spine fusion is used to stabilize a single level or multiple levels of the spine. A fusion is most commonly performed on the neck or low back.

  • Chip Review @ (11:58): El Tio Papilio – Spanish Ham

  • Trivia question of the week @ (09:52): Which country is home to the longest canal in the world?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

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Google Play:

Youtube: 

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Brief overview of the episode: 

            Spine fusion is done when there is an unstable segment or segments of the spinal column. Most commonly this is done if there has been trauma, a spondylolithesis or as a correction for scoliosis. In some cases you will see a fusion performed for stenosis, post discectomy or post laminectomy.
            Over the last 20 years spine fusions have become more common. This is especially true for the 65 years old and older populations. It is more common for men to have a fusion than women.
            The procedure consists of accessing the spine, either from an anterior approach or posterior approach. A series of metal rods and screws or plates and screws is used to stabilize the vertebra. This can be done at one level or multiple levels of the spinal column. In all cases a bone graft or other grafting material will be placed to cause a permanent fixation.
            The graft material will usually solidify in 6-10 weeks at which point the metal rods, screws and plate are present for additional support but are no longer the prime immobilizer.
            During that 6-10 week period caution must be used to allow the graft material to heal properly. Precautions will always include no bending, lifting or twisting.
            The procedures performed will be similar for the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spines. It is uncommon to have a fusion in the thoracic spine though it does occur when necessary. Most spine fusions occur in the cervical and lumbar spines.
            As is the case with all surgery but is especially true with spine surgery, this is something that should be done as a last resort. It is important to attempt all appropriate non-surgical treatment options before going “under the knife”.

 

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Pain: Episode 29

Discectomy: Episode 81

Discectomy: Episode 81

 

Spine Surgery Overview: Episode 80

  • In this episode: Spine surgery; we touch on the common surgical procedures as well as reasons to consider surgery or physical therapy.

  • Chip Review @ (12:47): Chipsy (Hot & Lemon Sauced) Chilli Lemon – These chips are from Egypt – Thank you Khem

  • Trivia question of the week @ (11:29): Who has the most NHL all-star game assists?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

Apple Podcasts:

Google Play:

Youtube: 

Stitcher: 

Podbean: 

Brief overview of the episode:

            In this episode we do an overview of spine surgery. There are many options out there and depending on the situation they can all be helpful.
            It is important to remember that spine surgery is not a fix all. Sometime pain in your back is due to situations that cannot or should not be corrected by surgery. Pain in general is not the best indicator of surgery.
            Atrophy, numbness, tingling, loss of sensation or muscle control are in most cases strong indicators that surgery would be appropriate. Everything has to be considered on an individual basis. Sudden acute changes or trauma are more concerning than a slow progression.
            Just because an x-ray or MRI shows a structural change it is important make sure that change is causing your symptoms. That is why a full diagnostic work up is a must before considering surgery. Don’t forget conservative care is not passive it is everything other than surgery.

 

Other Episodes you might enjoy:

Imaging: Episode 45

Low Back Pain: Episode14

Stenosis: Episode 36

Core/Abdominal Wall: Episode 35

Pain: Episode 29

 

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