Lisfranc Injury/Fracture: Episode 59

  • In this episode: We cover the Lizfranc fracture/injury. This a fracture dislocation of the metatarsals from the tarsals, a mid foot sprain.

  • Chip Review: Snatt’s – Limon Y Tomillo (08:45)

  • Trivia question of the week: The air in a potato chip bag is not air, what is it? (08:02)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

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Brief except from the episode:

Lisfranc fracture or Lisfranc injury as it is now often called is an injury where at least one of the metatarsals is separated from the tarsal. This typically occurs as a fracture and dislocation but can be only a dislocation.
This injury is named for Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin, a field surgeon in Napoleons army. He would perform amputations along the tarsal metatarsal line because this allowed soldiers to return to combat much sooner.
During the Napoleonic wars cavalry soldiers would fall of their horses but one foot would remain in the stirrup. As the horse would continue to move the weight of the body would twist the foot in such a way that the tarsal metatarsal joint would become stressed and a fracture dislocation would occur.
In today’s world we don’t see many Lisfranc injuries but they do occur. This can occur with sports, typical football, or as a result of an accident. The foot becomes stuck in a position where the forefoot is held in place and the body moves in another direction.
The Lisfranc injury takes a long time to recovery. It is more uncomfortable and has a longer impact then most ankle sprains. Because it occurs in the foot and the mechanism of injury is often similar to an ankle sprain. It can be initially misdiagnosed as an ankle sprain.

De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

  • In this episode: De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis Pain on the thumb side of the wrist. It is most common in new parents and those who perform repeated wrist motions.

  • Chip Review: Snatt’s – Queso Y Eneldo (11:20)

  • Trivia question of the week: Who was the first person in space? (09:02)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

Apple Podcasts:

Google Play:

Youtube: 

Stitcher: 

Podbean: 

Brief except from the episode:

De Quervains Tenosynovitis, pain on the thumb side of the wrist. Officially it is inflammation of the sheath surrounding the tendons of the thumb. The Abductor Pollicis and the Extensor Pollicis Longus. Which also makes up what is called the “Anatomical Snuffbox”.
If you make a thumbs up, there will be two tendons present, these are Abductor Pollicis and Extensor Pollicis Longus. The space between them is the “Anatomical Snuffbox”.
Typically De Quervains Tenosynovitis is pretty painful. It is however, easy to use the Finkelsteins test to assess if you have De Quervains Tenosynovitis on your own (Click for video).
If you are dealing with De Quervains Tenosynovitis hopefully it is still early on. Typically these symptoms come around quickly, if you take care of them early they will go away quickly. Don’t let these symptoms linger!
Other episodes you might enjoy:

Wrist Pain: Episode 41

Tennis Elbow and Golfers Elbow: Episode 7

Intro to Rebound Therapy and Wellness Clinic: Episode 1

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