Neuropathy

  

  • Neuropathy occurs when peripheral nerves are damaged. This can happen for a number of reasons ranging from diabetes, infections, chemotherapy and drug or alcohol abuse.

  • Chip Review @ (08:05): Kroger – Prime Rib & Horseradish

  • Trivia question of the week @ (06:02): Which is Canada’s most populated city?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

 

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Brief overview of the episode:

            There are upwards of 20 million American dealing with neuropathy. This is a condition that can affect sensory, motor and autonomic nerves, usually of the feet and hands. It can present in 3 forms, mononeuropathy, multiple –mononeuropathy and the most common version poly-neuropathy.

            With each version symptoms are typical fairly similar, loss of sensation, pain, weakness, coordination issues and possibly bowel and bladder problems. Most people who are affected are 60 years old or older. But this is a condition that can affect anyone.

            Some causes of neuropathy include diabetes, infections, toxin exposure, poor nutrition, alcoholism and kidney failure. Typically pain is the first symptom. This can be sharp, throbbing, aching or burning. As symptoms progress typically pain lessens but numbness and sensation changes worsen.

            Treatment for neuropathy usually begins with treating the underlying cause. So managing diabetes, infections and kidney failure is highly beneficial. Physical therapy plays a role in working to up train limitations to help with balance and falls prevention.

 

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Radicular Pain: Episode 22

Radicular Pain: Episode 22

Fall prevention & Balance: Episode 19

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: Episode 70

  • In this episode: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) is compression of nerves or blood vessels near the neck and shoulder resulting in pain, numbness, weakness and sometimes cold and blue hands or fingers.

  • Chip Review: Bohemaia – Paprika (Thank You Susan Jerman) – (13:23)

  • Trivia question of the week: What bone are babies born without? (10:43)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

Apple Podcasts:

Google Play:

Youtube: 

Stitcher: 

Podbean: 

Brief overview of the episode:

            Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) is compression of the blood vessels or nerves resulting in pain, numbness, weakness and sometimes cold and blue hands or fingers. Compression is of the brachial plexus (a nerve bundle around the neck/armpit area, think sciatic nerve but of the arms) or the subclabian artery or subclavian vein.
            Signs and symptoms include numbness in hands and arms, pain in neck/shoulder/arms, hands, weak grip, possible muscle wasting in the hands (usually at the thumb). There can also be swelling in arms and hands, discoloration and or cold hands, weak pulse and sometimes throbbing near the collarbone.
            Causes of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome are trauma, repetivie motions, backpack or similar providing an external pressure, posture or anatomical changes and pregnancy. TOS is most commonly seen in females, about 70% of cases, and with individuals aged between 20-50 years of age.
            Typically with physical therapy symptoms can be lessened or reduced entirely. However, on occasion surgery is performed.

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Radicular Pain: Episode 22

Biceps Tendonitis: Episode 24

Intro to Rebound Therapy and Wellness Clinic: Episode 1

Cervicogenic Headache: Episode 10

Upper and Lower Extremity Posture: Episode 8

 

De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

  • In this episode: De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis Pain on the thumb side of the wrist. It is most common in new parents and those who perform repeated wrist motions.

  • Chip Review: Snatt’s – Queso Y Eneldo (11:20)

  • Trivia question of the week: Who was the first person in space? (09:02)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

Apple Podcasts:

Google Play:

Youtube: 

Stitcher: 

Podbean: 

Brief except from the episode:

De Quervains Tenosynovitis, pain on the thumb side of the wrist. Officially it is inflammation of the sheath surrounding the tendons of the thumb. The Abductor Pollicis and the Extensor Pollicis Longus. Which also makes up what is called the “Anatomical Snuffbox”.
If you make a thumbs up, there will be two tendons present, these are Abductor Pollicis and Extensor Pollicis Longus. The space between them is the “Anatomical Snuffbox”.
Typically De Quervains Tenosynovitis is pretty painful. It is however, easy to use the Finkelsteins test to assess if you have De Quervains Tenosynovitis on your own (Click for video).
If you are dealing with De Quervains Tenosynovitis hopefully it is still early on. Typically these symptoms come around quickly, if you take care of them early they will go away quickly. Don’t let these symptoms linger!
Other episodes you might enjoy:

Wrist Pain: Episode 41

Tennis Elbow and Golfers Elbow: Episode 7

Intro to Rebound Therapy and Wellness Clinic: Episode 1

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