Proximal Hamstring: Episode 75

  • In this episode: Having a pain in the butt? There is a good chance you are dealing with an injury to your proximal hamstring.

  • Chip Review: Joe Chips – Classic Sea Salt (11:48)

  • Trivia question of the week: – Who was the only bachelor President of the United States? (10:18)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

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Brief overview of the episode:

         The proximal hamstring is the portion closest part to your buttocks. All three muscles of the hamstrings attach to the ischial tuberosity. Which is sometimes referred to as the sits bone. This is the bone you sit on when you are riding a bicycle. An injury to this area will feel like a pain in the buttocks.
          Injuries in this area can include tendonitis, tendonosis, avulsions and bursitis. These types of injuries tend to be more irritate and as such can become chronic.
          Mechanics of injury is the same for proximal hamstring injuries as it is for muscle belly or distal hamstring injuries. An eccentric contraction with the hip flexed and the knee extended. Putting the hamstring in it longest length. This is most common with slips and falls as well as from sports.
        Avulsion fractures of the ischial tuberosity are starting be to seen more often. With an avulsion a small portion of the bone is fractured off, but remains connected to the tendon. In most cases this can not be feel or seen without the use of an MRI. Best evidence at this time has found that most avulsions will heal without the need for surgical intervention.
         A good way to differentiate between an avulsion and tendonitis is when performing eccentric contractions of the hamstring. With repeated exercise a tendonitis will improve an avulsion however, will not.
         As with most injuries if you suspect some has occurred it is always a good idea to have it check out earlier rather than later to prevent it becoming a chronic issues that will take much longer to heal.

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS): Episode 9

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS): Episode 9

 

 

Hamstring Injuries: Episode 74

  • In this episode: We discuss hamstring injuries more broadly. The difference between grade I, II & III tears. Expected recovery times for each as well as muscle belly versus tendon injuries.

  • Chip Review: Croky – Paprika (Thank you Karin) (15:36)

  • Trivia question of the week: How many muscles in an elephant’s trunk? – (13:42)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

Apple Podcasts:

Google Play:

Youtube: 

Stitcher: 

Podbean: 

Brief overview of the episode:

           Hamstring injuries you hear about strains, tears, pulls, tendonitis, tendonosis, ruptures and avulsions. The general signs and symptoms are going to be pain in the back of the thigh. Typically this is sharp and sudden during an activity (sports, slips and falls). This will be followed by days of soreness, likely bruising, weakness, tenderness, and difficulty weight bearing or walking. Usually the first few steps after sitting will be the most uncomfortable. In high-grade cases sitting itself will be uncomfortable.
            Anatomically the hamstrings are comprised of the semimembranosus and semitendinosus on the medial aspect of the posterior thigh and the biceps femoris on the lateral aspect. The semimembranosus and semitendinosus will feel like a single muscle when palpated. Injuries can occur to all three. Because there are three distinct muscle there an injury to 1 will not prevent active knee flexion. It will weaken it and make it painful.
            Tears will be graded based on severity. Grade I tears are more mild and are often called strains. Grade II tears will be partial thickness tears and Grade III tears will be full thickness tears or ruptures.
            Grade I tears will heal within 3 weeks in most cases. Grade II tears can take up to 3 months and Grade III tears can be 9 months or longer. The greatest risk factor in sustaining a hamstring injury is a prior hamstring injury. Therefor it is important to take your time to full recovery from any hamstring injury.
            In most cases an injury to your hamstring is a result of a muscle imbalance. Either there is meaningful difference between your quadriceps strength and hamstring strength or, more likely, there is a weakness with hip abduction and/or external rotation. These muscle imbalances will cause the hamstring to over work and result in the injury.

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Fall prevention & Balance: Episode 19

Stretching: Episode 25

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS): Episode 9

 

Hamstring Injury: Episode 42

  • In this episode: We discuss hamstring injuries. Typical causes, predisposition factors, treatment and prevention.

  • Chip Review: Ikea – Potatischips Saltade (Aidan Bosman)

  • Trivia question of the week: What is the driest place on Earth?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

Hamstring injury. Lets discuss our pet peeve right off the bat. If I hear one more announcer on TV say “ That looks like a hamstring” or “He’s got a hamstring”, i’m going to loose it. We all have hamstrings in fact each of use has 3 on both legs. It is so interesting that this way of talking about it has basically gotten a life of it’s own. Ok I feel better now.
The hamstring has three main parts. The biceps femoris which makes up the lateral portion and the semitendinosus and semimembranosus which make up the medial portion. When you bend your knee you will feel the tendons, almost like guitar strings. One on the outside, biceps femoris one on the inside, semitendinosus and semimembranosus.
The biggest injury you will see here is pull or strain. These are both names for some form of tear. The tear is typically small but you can have large tears. At times there can be a lot of black and blue (ecchymosis) as well swelling. The discoloration is not always indicative of the extent of the injury.
This is one of the tougher injuries because it is difficult to rest. The biggest risk factor for having a hamstring injury is a prior hamstring injury. So that means if you have injuried the hamstring before you are more likely to do it again.
Make sure you don’t try to race back. Once these become chronic they tend to stick with people for a long time. You see it in the professional athlete world. They return in a few weeks, their first real big movement back and they injury it again.
In most cases running is the number one cause. This is often a change in speed accelerating or decelerating. Kicking is not as often the cause but when it is there is typically a much more damaging injury and takes longer to come back from.

Other Podcasts you might be interested in:

Stretching

Pain: Episode 29

 

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS): Episode 9

 

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