Osteopenia/Osteoporosis

 

  • Osteopenia is the early stage of osteoporosis. Both are the loss of bone mass and result in a weakening of the bone leading to increased risk of fracture.

  • Chip Review @ (08:24): Kettle Brand – Parmesan Garlic

  • Trivia question of the week @ (06:03): What is Canada’s most populated city?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

 

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Brief overview of the episode:

            Osteoporosis translates to pores bone. This is a condition that is affecting about 3 million Americans right now. More women than men are affected. Osteopenia is the early stage. Where bone density is beginning to deteriorate but has not yet reached a critical stage.

            The reason these two conditions are a concern is become weak bones have a greater opportunity to fracture. These can occur without trauma when the condition is sever enough. Most people who are affected by osteoporosis will present with back pain, stopped posture and loss of height. All of these symptoms are a result of fracture to the spine.

            The good news is that both osteopenia and osteoporosis can be treated to some extent. Medications, diet changes, and exercises are the prime methods. Physical therapy can help with the exercise portion.

            Bones respond to something called “Wolf’s Law” this law states that bones respond to stresses placed on them. When there is low stress the bone loses density. When there is higher stress the bones gain density. This is why exercises is such a valuable tool when treating osteopenia/osteoporosis.

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:  

Stretching: Episode 25

Dr. Mike Pascoe Interview: Episode 12

Stress Fractures: Episode 43

Ankylosing Spondylitis

  • In this episode: Ankylosing Spondylitis is an autoimmune disorder that affects the spine, eyes and heart. With physical therapy the biggest concern is fusion of spinal segments. Usually beginning in near the sacrum and lumbar spines. Its biggest concern is loss of rib cage expansion limiting respiration.

  • Chip Review @ (13:07): Frozen – Utz Crab Chips (Thank you Linda Payne)

  • Trivia question of the week @ (11:56): Which dinosaur’s name translates to “fused-lizard”?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

Apple Podcasts:

Google Play:

Youtube: 

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Podbean: 

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Brief overview of the episode:

            Ankylosing Spondylitis is a rare auto-immune disease that predominantly affects the spine. It causes the spine to fuse along its length. Fusion typically begin near the SI joint though the biggest concern is when it causes the costoverterbal (ribcage) joints to fuse. This prevents typical respiration. There are additional affects on the eyes as well as the heart.

            When treating someone who has Ankylosing Spondylitis the main goal is to prevent the spine from fusing in a hunched posture. This limits loss of function, improves respiration and limits the impact on daily life that can occur when left untreated.

            Physical therapy is provided in conjunction with medication. As Ankylosing Spondylitis falls under the rheumatic diseases it has been found to have a common genetic component. Individuals who have Ankylosing Spondylitis presents with the HLA – B28 gene 95% of the time. Having the HLA-B28 gene is not however, a diagnosis as most individuals with it will not present with symptoms of Ankylosing Spondylitis.

            The prevalence is about 0.1-0.2% of the population. It affects men 3x as often as women and is most likely to affect white individuals.

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Discectomy: Episode 81

Stretching: Episode 25

Stress Fractures: Episode 43

 

 

Laminectomy/Laminotomy: Episode 82 

  • In this episode: What is the difference between a Laminectomy and Laminotomy and when are they used.

  • Chip Review @ (07:29): Deep River – Mango Habanero

  • Trivia question of the week @ (05:16): What is a group of hippos called?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below 

Apple Podcasts:

Google Play:

Youtube: 

Stitcher: 

Podbean: 

Spotify:

 

Brief overview of the episode: 

            Laminectomy and laminotomy are both used to increase space around a spinal nerve. They are both forms of spinal decompression.
            Laminectomy is a complete removal of the lamina which is a part of the spinal vertebra. This procedure can often be on it’s own but it is often done in conjunction with a fusion. A fusion is done because the full removal of the lamina can lead to instability, specifically anterior instability known as a spondylolisthesis.
            Laminotomy is a partial removal of the lamina. This opens up space but maintains stability. This procedure is usually done without any additional surgical intervention.
            Both are typically done when stenosis is present and non-surgical treatment has not provided adequate pain relief. It is always a good idea to purse all non-surgical options prior to committing to a spinal surgery because at the end of the day you can’t put the lamina back.

 


Other Episodes you might enjoy:

Pain: Episode 29

Discectomy: Episode 81

Stenosis: Episode 36

 

Scoliosis: Episode 37

  • In this episode: We cover Scoliosis. Which has several varieties affecting people across the lifespan.

  • Chip Review: Albert Heijn Kronkels – Big ups to McKenna Homner for the hand delivery

  • Trivia question of the week: We forgot to ask it but it should have been – What is the highest grossing movie of the 80’s?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

Scoliosis is our topic today and we will be reviewing Albert Heijn Kronkels, compliments of McKenna Homner. Kronkels also known as Vockles. Yes, this is the store brand version. They are a little wider then the Vockle which is a tight spiral. Like a corkscrew. Yes, the Vockle is more like a Fritos Twist.
Scoliosis, there are a couple main types. We won’t be able to fully discuss all the kinds. The big diagnosis value is the Cobb Angle. The Cobb Angle measures the amount of curvature in the spine. Anything-greater than 10degrees is considered officially scoliosis. That could be functional which you could actively correct. Or postural which you could not actively correct.
When with physical therapy we see a secondary diagnosis of scoliosis that is typically a functional instead of structural. Commonly the functional type is 10ish degrees or at least milder.
One of the more commons ones is adolescent idiopathic. This is going to affect a small percentage. Less then 5% of kids going through their teenage years, the growth spurt years. These are individuals without any other cause for the curvature. So idiopathic means; without a cause.
The more significant forms are congenital, which is due typically to a birth defect and neuromuscular which is secondary to another issue; Muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy or some other kind of neurological disorder.
Scoliosis is either a “C” or “S” shape. This is named for the curve the spine assumes. If you look at someone’s back and the spine is not straight like and “I” but curves like a “C”. That would be a “C” scoliosis. If it has a double curve then it would be an “S” scoliosis.

Check out some of these related podcast topics:

 

Core/Abdominal Wall: Episode 35

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction: Episode 27

Low Back Pain: Episode14

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