Ankylosing Spondylitis

  • In this episode: Ankylosing Spondylitis is an autoimmune disorder that affects the spine, eyes and heart. With physical therapy the biggest concern is fusion of spinal segments. Usually beginning in near the sacrum and lumbar spines. Its biggest concern is loss of rib cage expansion limiting respiration.

  • Chip Review @ (13:07): Frozen – Utz Crab Chips (Thank you Linda Payne)

  • Trivia question of the week @ (11:56): Which dinosaur’s name translates to “fused-lizard”?

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

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Brief overview of the episode:

            Ankylosing Spondylitis is a rare auto-immune disease that predominantly affects the spine. It causes the spine to fuse along its length. Fusion typically begin near the SI joint though the biggest concern is when it causes the costoverterbal (ribcage) joints to fuse. This prevents typical respiration. There are additional affects on the eyes as well as the heart.

            When treating someone who has Ankylosing Spondylitis the main goal is to prevent the spine from fusing in a hunched posture. This limits loss of function, improves respiration and limits the impact on daily life that can occur when left untreated.

            Physical therapy is provided in conjunction with medication. As Ankylosing Spondylitis falls under the rheumatic diseases it has been found to have a common genetic component. Individuals who have Ankylosing Spondylitis presents with the HLA – B28 gene 95% of the time. Having the HLA-B28 gene is not however, a diagnosis as most individuals with it will not present with symptoms of Ankylosing Spondylitis.

            The prevalence is about 0.1-0.2% of the population. It affects men 3x as often as women and is most likely to affect white individuals.

 

Other episodes you might enjoy:

Discectomy: Episode 81

Stretching: Episode 25

Stress Fractures: Episode 43

 

 

Osteoarthritis & Rheumatoid Arthritis: Episode 57

  • In this episode: A brief introduction to Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid arthritis. They share a few similarities but ultimately are very different processes.

  • Chip Review: UTZ “The Crab Chips” (12:46)

  • Trivia question of the week: What is the largest freshwater lake in the world? (10:49)

  • Follow us on Instagram: 2pts_n_a_bagofchips and/or Twitter @2PTsNaBagOChips to see photos, video and get additional episode specific information throughout the week.

  • Thanks for listening!!

To Subscribe, Review and Download select your preferred hyperlink below

Apple Podcasts: 

Google Play: 

Youtube: 

Stitcher: 

Podbean: 

Brief except from the episode:

Osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) this will be a little bit of an overview of the differences between the two, because they do get mixed up at times. Arthritis is Latin for arthros (joint) and itis (inflammation). Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are very different. However, they do share a few similarities early on in their progression.
Arthritis can happen in any joint. Usually osteoarthritis is more common in the large joints and rheumatoid arthritis in the smaller joints.
Some of the symptoms of osteoarthritis are pain, stiffness, tenderness, ROM loss, swelling. Osteoarthritis is pretty darn common; as we age we all end up with it somewhere. This does not mean that it will hurt or limit our activities. What is happening is the cartilage in the joints in wearing down. This is a normal process that occurs with anything that gets used. If you use something by default it gets worn down.
With rheumatoid arthritis you will often experience similar symptoms initially to osteoarthritis. Pain, tenderness, ROM loss, swelling and stiffness, (usually in the AM or after inactivity). These symptoms are often accompanied by fatigue, loss of appetite and fever. RA can also affect the skin, eyes, lungs and heart.
Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease. It is chronic inflammation of the joint lining. So as that lining is inflamed and irritated the cartilage and bone are surrounded by inflammation that will over time cause them to wear down.
Since rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder a good portion of its management will be through medication. It is really important to address the systemic issues related to this disease to stop or at least slow down the affects of the chronic inflammation.
Other Episodes you Might Enjoy:

Upper and Lower Extremity Posture: Episode 8

Fall prevention & Balance: Episode 19

Stretching: Episode 25

 

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